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I just finished the sound design and mix for this, check it out:

It was great to be involved from the start – building a sound bed from the storyboards before the film was shot, recording all the dialogue dialogue and sound effects, through to mixing the final tv versions and supervising the cinema mix (by Jamie Roden at Goldcrest).

I worked closely with Sam Brock (head of radio at BBH) throughout the creation of the sound design, initially recording dialogue with my location kit around London and working remotely from my own studio.  For the final dialogue recordings and sound effects work I dry hired a fantastic sounding Pro Tools room at Goldcrest Post attended by the whole creative team.

This advert was directed by Anthony Dickenson from Pulse Films, with visual effects work by Time Based Arts.

The sound effects work for this involved a lot of laser noise making, mainly using various synth noise generators, and the Ohm Force filter plugin ‘Quad Fromage’ which has a great comb filter.  The comb filter creates most of the metallic movement of the laser noises, blended with electricity fizzling and burning noises to give it that organic edge.

Other than all the synthetic stuff, I recorded a whole load of foley with Graeme Elston at Jungle Studios, and took it back to my studio for editing and mixing.  The foley was essential to give the film that hyper-real quality, and having lots of clean layers of sound gave me more control over the dynamics.

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I tried to blend the sound effects with the track by 16bit, so that hopefully the audience see them as one entity… anyway 16 bit are amazing producers, check their myspace!

This was directed by Chris Cairns for the danish Agency, ‘Thankyou’.  Chris and I have collaborated on quite a few musical projects over the years but this one was a bit different – the final work was always going to be written by Trentemoller (check out his stuff if you haven’t heard it, it’s brilliant).

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Initially I wrote a skeleton track for Chris so that we could time out which order his storyboards would be cut.  Mr Cairns’ idea was to link certain groups or individuals within the film with parts of the track, so with this in mind I created clear themes in the drums, bass and lead parts that would work with certain mechanisms within the film.  This initial skeleton was then passed on to Anders Trentemoller so he would have a template for the visual edit when composing the final music.

During post production and as I built the sound design elements within the film, the visual effects team (Time Based Arts) and I shared our work constantly.  This process helped generate some of the effects that were created, in particular the style of the digital reduction of the dancers.  A lot of the effects I made were using the Sonalksis bit crushing plugin amongst others, and the new GRM Tools plugins that came out in 2011 – they are quite obscure and can produce some fairly nasty sounds!

This film is one of a series of animations for Mini.  They were projected on a huge scale on the sides of buildings, and the sound could be heard through PA systems at viewpoints where the public could interact with the films and choose what played next.

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As the cars were all animated, we had a Mini Cooper recorded with a multiple mic setup as it was put through its paces by a test driver, who performed donuts and skids until the engine blew out.  It was from these multitrack recordings that I pieced together all the car movements in the sound edit.  In this particular film (Lasers) I created a bunch of laser sounds using sound effects combined with synth blasts made on a Novation Supernova 2, along with a bunch of rock and explosion sfx from the sound library.

Check out this track I wrote for Nokia starring card flourisher Max Vlassenko.

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To go with the homemade brief, most of the percussion was recorded in my talented percussionist and friend Nick Smalley’s front room… we recorded anything we could get our hands on that sounded tasty.  Everything from a humble cheese grater to a didgeridoo got hit, all recorded on my Sony PCM D50 handheld recorder.  I then made selects, chopped them up and polished it all into the finished thing in my studio within Pro Tools.